Fanboy Slim: Donald Cerrone (32-7-0-1)

fan·boy
ˈfanboi/
noun
informalderogatory
a male fan, especially one who is obsessive about movies, comic books, or science fiction.
I will add to that definition – obsessive about a fighter.

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Fanboy Slim: Miesha tate (18-7-0)

fan·boy
ˈfanboi/
noun
1. informalderogatory
a male fan, especially one who is obsessive about movies, comic books, or science fiction.
I will add to that definition – obsessive about a fighter.

Continue reading

Fanboy Slim: Georges St. Pierre (25-2-0)

fan·boy
ˈfanboi/
noun
1. informalderogatory
a male fan, especially one who is obsessive about movies, comic books, or science fiction.
I will add to that definition – obsessive about a fighter.
In this series of posts, I will reveal (not that it’s a big secret to whoever scans my twitter or facebook feeds) who are my favorite fighters of all time. I do not hate any fighter. I respect them all and like most. But there are those who I’m just… well a fanboy of.
There’s no denying, GSP is, was and likely will be my all-time favorite fighter. He is also arguably the best MMA fighter of all times. This latter statement is forever challenged by people who dislike his style and I’m fine with that. To each his own.

Photo credit: gspofficial.com

GSP holds the record for WW title defenses, has only 2 losses, which he decidedly avenged, has fought a long list of the best WWs available, including previous champions in multiple organizations, and retired (semi?) holding a belt. Since recapturing the title, he lost perhaps a handful of rounds in the ensuing 9 fights.
GSP’s fights, following his decimation of Matt Serra to win back the belt, were quite predictable. As a fanboy, that didn’t comfort me until I heard Bruce Buffer say “And Still”. They were predictable not in the sense that you knew exactly what to expect. After all, he did outstrike and beat down strikers, outwrestled and controlled wrestlers and generally did everything his opponents said he couldn’t leading up to their inevitable defeat.
St. Pierre is not an “old school” MMA fighter, nor can he be considered part of what we like to call “New breed” (e.g. Rory MacDonald, Conor McGregor and others), but I do consider him a pioneer and an inspiration to this new breed of fighters. Those who may not be THE best at a specific discipline, but are simply very good in all of them. Being well rounded is an insurance plan, and GSP was admittedly safe. He was criticized for that, but as promised, I say it again – it is a sport. A career that ends at an age when a second one can (and should) begin. There really is no need to get hit in the face if you can – not…
GSP sets the bar when it comes to respect for the sport, his opponents, the fans. He sets the bar for consistency and success. He sets the bar for being a professional fighter and he is one of the best ambassadors for the sport of MMA.
If you want to have a blueprint of how to be a healthy (for the most part), well rounded, successful and respected practitioner of martial arts, Georges St. Pierre drew it. It could be expanded upon, elaborated and painted in many colors. But as a foundation, you will not find a stronger one than that of GSP.
Are you a fan of GSP? A fanboy? 
What do you like about him? 
What would you have wanted to be different? And why?

Stay tuned as more MMA legends take the stage.


Fixing MMA – Part One

MMA is an emerging sport, even if it’s a far cry from the obscure, underground kind of cage fighting it was only ten years ago. Even if many people who have no idea what MMA means, know of Conor McGregor and Ronda Rousey.
Just think about the legends of some popular sports. NBA, Soccer, Baseball and such. Some of them are long gone, having died of natural causes at an old age.
Contrary to these, the majority of MMA legends are able to raise new families, should they choose to do so.
So why – you might ask – should we fix a sport that is just breaking out of its shell? And is it even broken, to begin with?

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The answers to these questions are “So it grows to be a healthy and responsible adult.” And “Not really, it just needs some guidance like any adolescent.” Respectively.
Having said that, there is quite a bit of work to do, if we (MMA fans, present and future) want to enjoy it for years to come.
In this short series of posts, I’d like to offer my perspective on what could be done to push the sport in the right direction.
First and foremost – I hope you’d agree – is the fighter’s health and safety.
A lot is done already, whether via the rules of the fight or through substance control imposed on fighters, in order to make this sport as safe as can be. The fighters assume certain risks, to be sure, but it is fairly evident that it is as safe as say, Hockey or American football (if not more in some ways).
What I’m offering is adding a couple of safe guards.
The first thing I suggest is the addition of 3 more weight classes to the men and one more for women. There are big gaps between the middle weight tiers, namely between welterweight, Middleweight, Light Heavyweight and Heavyweight.
Adding 177 lb, 195 lb and 215 lb classes will achieve two goals (also 145 lb for the ladies).
1. Allow people of borderline “walking weight” to make weight easily and without taxing their bodies more than really necessary for a sport. And mind you, this is a sport after all. Not life and death.
2. Allow those small middle weights, large light-heavyweights etc. to find a home where they can be more competitive and not be at a constant disadvantage due to being too small for class A, but too heavy for the one under. Examples? Kelving Gastelum, Johny Hendricks, Charles Oliveira to name a few.
Another thing I think should be done is limit the allowed weight cut. Consult with nutritionists and other experts and come up with a certain “walking weight” that corresponds with the relevant minimum weight class. No one expects Roy Nelson to fight at Welterweight, right? How about Middleweight? What is too much weight cut? Let’s not find the answer out when a fighter suffers severe injury or god forbid more. Let’s make sure that no one even attempts to cut enough weight to risk more than is reasonable. You will hear me say that again and again – this is sport. People should not die for entertainment value or even for greatness (in whose eyes?).
I hope that makes sense, and if not, would absolutely love to hear what your thoughts are regarding fighter’s safety.
Are there more things that could (should) be done to protect the people we love to watch?


Money Talks (Fighter’s pay, or lack there of)

Hello everyone and welcome back,
It’s been a while, I know. I have a very good reason too. I will elaborate soon with a relevant post, but for now suffice to say – I’m writing.
While my creative juices are running, I take some methodical brakes to check what’s going on in the outside world and what I see there these past couple of weeks is the motivation for this post, namely, the increase in conversation regarding fighters pay.

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UFC 196 – Predictions

Hi everybody!

2016 Started with a bang and then a PPV that turned into a free card. But that’s ok, because once more, it’s a title fight between two of my favorite WMMA fighters – Miesha Tate and Holly Holm. And if that’s not enough, There’s that Mystic Mac fighting Nate Diaz. Need more? Continue reading